What’s possible at the union of self and service, the place where your deep gladness meets the world’s deep need?

Posted December 2, 2016 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Culture of Philanthropy, Gary Hubbell Consulting Conversation, Uncategorized

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“How can I raise more money for my organization when we’re so big and we make gifts/grants in the community?”

This was the question that prompted a former client—a large hospital system foundation executive team—to invite me to help them answer that question. With apparent variations by sub-sector, it’s a common question among fundraising professionals. Why? What’s at work among so many professionals where these barriers serve to shrink possibility and constrict action and lift?

The story of this former client has many parallels. But I’m getting ahead of myself. First, the story….

Clearly, as I interviewed a few staff by phone and then arrived for an on-site staff retreat, this question had been bothering the team for quite some time. They explained that, while feeling well supported by administration and board, they operated daily under a felt pressure to raise more money. In their eyes, the context they were facing was narrowing the likelihood for success rather than expanding it. Staff, veteran fundraisers and newcomers alike, were feeling a pinch.

What to do? They asked, “How can we get organizational leaders to see that by being the largest employer in the area, by making grants to sponsor, underwrite, and support other community organizations, and by routinely seeing media headlines about the high cost of health care…foundation staff are running into stiff headwinds when trying to ask people to support the projects and people of the hospital system.”

“What if we take a few minutes to see if we can verbalize our assumptions beneath this question,” I suggested. Fine. OK. Whatever, their eyes said to me. “You work for a big, high profile nonprofit organization whose work potentially affects everyone and you’re asked to raise money on the organization’s behalf and gift or grant money on their behalf out in the community. Why is this a problem for you in your work as a fundraiser?” The responses came quickly:

  • “The hospital system’s big size is problematic.”
  • “Health care costs are high.”
  • “We (the hospital system) don’t/can’t demonstrate need.”

Undeterred, I pressed on. “So, why is that a problem for you?” Responses were:

  • “We think and act small (we’re modest).”
  • “The foundation isn’t as well-known as the hospital.”
  • “We’re part of an historical wave of need-driven fundraising in this state.”

“OK, why is that a problem for you in your work?” Their responses were:

  • “It’s (the message) about us.”
  • “Need is the principle driver of giving.”

Asking for their patience, I persisted again. “Why is that a problem?” Their responses—sometimes quite emphatically delivered—were:

  • “The priority is the money. It’s all about the money.”
  • “We’re fundraisers; therefore, it’s all about the money.”

Despite the shared exasperation in the room, I asked one final time: “Why is this a problem? What’s going on inside you that leads to this feeling like a problem?” Here the responses came more slowly and with less surety and far less intensity:

  • “We want our jobs to be easier and/or more rewarding.”
  • “I’m just plain uncomfortable with money conversations. I know ‘they’ won’t give if I don’t ask. I have to couch the ask in such a way that’s less objectionable.”

Don’t you feel tired just reading that conversation? In the room that day, I sure felt that way and I sensed the staff team did as well. I could see it in their faces and body language. It’s like we had stripped away the layers of psychic self-protection to expose a core vulnerability. Now what? My intent, then as now, is to highlight a required process of introspection, challenging false assumptions, and letting go of those that are in the way. Where we sit determines what we see. Our mindset, mental model, and prevailing assumptions govern the causal (operating) structures we put in place, which produce our repetitive patterns of behavior, which leads to daily occurrences and events. Those things that we initially identified as insurmountable barriers to our success have their roots in our internal constructs.

Working with the staff that day, we exposed these previously unspoken assumptions to new light; new scrutiny. Here’s what we came up with together:

 

Old Assumption

New View

“I’m just plain uncomfortable with money conversations. I know ‘they’ won’t give if I don’t ask. I have to couch the ask in such a way that’s less objectionable. We want our jobs to be easier and/or more rewarding.”

I operate from a deep belief that people not only want to give to something outside themselves—bigger than themselves—they LIKE to give. Therefore, my job is to uncover their joy and inner gladness. To serve it. To celebrate the intersections with my organization’s direction and to honor it when it leads a person in another direction. In that way, little of my work is about money. It’s about what Frederick Buechner defined as vocation: when one’s inner gladness meets the world’s great need. Freed by this viewpoint, the size of my organization, the headlines it evokes, and the profile of our community collaborations is far less important than the inner journey of a donor. To help illuminate that self-selected path with a donor is a reward beyond most. Pride and confidence results.

“We (the hospital system) don’t/can’t demonstrate need.”

We’re responsible for meeting our own organizational needs. Therefore, operating profitably is a necessity and a signal of effectiveness and strong leadership. We turn outward to meet the real needs of community. Unchanged for over [100] years – the [hospital system] mission is unrelenting in its focus on [the poor and vulnerable]. We invest in community as guided by that same mission. We invite you to do likewise. Pride and confidence results.

“The hospital system’s big size is problematic. You act like a big corporate donor.”

Despite our big size, we can’t and won’t act alone. The social determinants of health are too pervasive and pernicious to be addressed alone. We choose to act in partnership with other community players, some of whom need and deserve our support for their efforts. Our big size is good. The hospital system has the infrastructure, knowledge, and connection to act with and in community to produce better health outcomes. Pride and confidence results.

“Health care costs are high.”

Agreed. Yet, health care reform is pulling hospital systems toward more “upstream” focus, rather than treating illness as presented in patients; and 2) the rising acceptance of hospital systems playing the role of “anchor institutions.” Best practice systems – like Kaiser Permanente – continue to demonstrate that leveraging our multiple assets as a total health organization contribute to community and economic vitality. The more fully we play these seven anchor institution roles, the more likely we will be to make lasting improvements in community well-being. Going “upstream” is a major step in the direction of creating leverage for lasting change that corrals high cost. Pride and confidence results.

“We think and act small (we’re modest).”

The profile of the foundation is largely immaterial. The profile of the hospital system is what matters if that profile can serve the biggest dreams and imagined possibilities of a donor. Pride and confidence results.

“We’re part of an historical wave of need-driven fundraising in this state.”

I will no longer be bound by how others have repeated manipulative messages of immediate organizational needs, lifting organizational vulnerability like it’s an asset. I will respect myself, my colleagues, my organizational scorekeepers, and donors with the truth. If in so doing, we appear to walk an independent path; so be it. We believe what every donor wants is to:

  • Be understood – “Know me, care for me, ease my way”
  • Interact with transparency in a real, reciprocal relationship
  • Be part of something important; something bigger than myself
  • Know that my gift is connected to some impact of the greater good

Pride and confidence results.

I am proud of Suzanne, Cynthia, and their whole team for their collective courage to illuminate what was in their blind spots. They started out chiefly concerned about what they thought were widely shared opinions by others. The team concluded that those opinions were largely projections of their own fears, magnified and codified as a story they had been telling themselves for a long time. So long, in fact, that they had come to believe the story was not only true but overwhelming. It was in the way of their success.

However, they came to see that the story was of their own construction…or at least their own passive, unchallenged acceptance as “just the way things are.” They had come to morph that storyline into one of their own heroic stance in the face of great odds—succeeding despite great odds.

Once able to step back with new perspective—seeing with new eyes—the team came to see that the primary blockage was their own internal frame. They had to challenge their views that people really didn’t want to give and wouldn’t give significant gifts joyfully and gratefully—in search of deeper meaning and lasting impact. They had to challenge their views that their success was largely the product of spending 95% of their time in prospect research, strategizing, secondary staging and all manner of “set design,” believing that their very limited (“one shot”??) time with the “prospective donor” had to be “just right” if they were going to succeed in “persuading” the person effectively enough to “get” the gift.

The beauty of the lesson embedded in this true story is that NOTHING in the external environment changed, but ONE BIG THING in the individual staff members’ internal framing and mindset changed. Each staff person was now being invited to practice shifting from pursuing their work from a position of overcoming barriers and manipulating (albeit kindly and with good heart) “prospective donors” to do something they instinctively didn’t want to do…to a position of prioritizing and savoring every possible moment with community philanthropy partners as an opportunity to discern that person’s greatest aspiration, wildest hope, deepest gratitude and exploring in the most transparent way how to work toward serving that intention together, all the while being unapologetic for the time required to build and nurture this trusting relationship.

Is a mindset shift like this as simple as waving a wand, peeling back faulty assumptions and gaining some new insight that unlocks potential? No. Neither this staff team nor I are that naïve. I believe that any new stated intention requires attention…and practice. This staff has the benefit of an employment context where everyone undergoes a personality profiling exercise (in their case, Personalysis), wherein each person gets a peek at how they are wired to think and respond. Knowing that inherent construct and now enlightened by new insight, the next phase is intentional practice. I also suggested this team routinely meet to share their individual insights about their journey to make the shift. In that way, not only do they teach and reinforce one another, they each practice their introspection in a transparent way with colleagues.

Best of all, this new shared commitment to this type of exchange is rebuilding team culture—reshaping their shared story of their heroic battle to one of joyful coaching of self-motivated partners. Collectively, they are rebuilding a healthy, energizing, appreciative culture at the union of self and service, the place where their deep gladness meets the world’s deep need.

While this story is obviously hospital system philanthropy-oriented, the parallels to other sectors are significant. What self-limiting prevailing assumptions are holding you and your program back from its optimal success? What’s possible when your deep humility meets your authentic desire to serve a donor, helping her uncover her most important dreams and motivations? What’s your highest and best imagination about a lasting solution to an issue that both your organization and your donor co-design?

These are conversations that matter. Getting to them involves the courage to be vulnerable, to challenge long-held ideas of what’s true. To let go of false assumptions.

Ask yourself, “What conversation do I most need to have? How could the clarity from that conversation open new possibilities—for me and for those I care about? What will I do about that now?”

Please call me when you’re ready to shape your conversation; when you’re willing to step beyond technique; when you’re ready to create or rebuild a team culture of authenticity, deep relationship, trust, transparency, joy…and love. That’s a conversation I’ll lean into with my whole being.

Warmly,

Gary

Scenario Thinking for Hospital System Foundation Leaders

Posted September 28, 2016 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Planning, scenario thinking

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Navigating Change as You “Rehearse the Future”

A common pitfall of leadership is sometimes being unable to see the forest for the trees. There are so many moving parts to the operating environment of any successful hospital system foundation that it’s easy to get lost in minutiae and not be able to identify the right questions to be asking of the strategic challenge ahead. If you have been asking yourself, “What decisions should I be making now amidst all these sweeping changes in order to position us for optimal operating success in the future?” then you’ll undoubtedly be hoping to see with new eyes how the central question could be answered.

My newest paper presents a scenario development tool that, while no panacea, helps you get to shared clarity and ownership of the work ahead. Additionally, it helps you marry your collective attention to your stated intention. Four operating scenarios are developed as an illustration of how to apply this thinking to your foundation.  Completing the scenario development exercise with your leadership team can provide you great insights and enable you to gauge the strategic thinking skills and adaptability of your team. Having done so in a proactive way, the operating transformations become more direct and the rationale for doing so becomes abundantly clear. In that way, you’ll avoid the drag of the skeptics and give the early adopters a clearer path on which to lead.

Free download of 7 page paper in PDF format

Acting from a Place of Conscientious Compassion

Posted August 21, 2015 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Uncategorized

Like many, I subscribe to numerous blogs and other daily feeds. Most don’t connect with me; some do; a few connect at the deepest level. This one did. In it, a Buddhist perspective from the Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi addresses climate change, social justice, and saving the world. His perspective is interesting and important on many levels. What animates me this morning is wondering to what extent social sector organizational leaders are actually having these kinds of conversations inside and outside their organizations.

Bodhi says we “can be most effective by networking with others who regard human dignity and the integrity of the natural world as more precious than monetary wealth. By joining together, a collective voice might emerge that could well set in motion the forces needed to articulate and embody a new paradigm rooted in the intrinsic dignity of the person and the interdependence of all life on Earth. Such collaboration could serve to promote the alternative values that offer sane alternatives to our free-market imperatives of corporatism, exploitation, extraction, consumerism, and toxic economic growth.”

Bodhi discusses two primary moral principles involved in this effort to work toward a new level of collective action. “One is love, which arises from empathy, the ability to feel the happiness and suffering of others as one’s own. When love is directed toward those afflicted with suffering, it manifests as compassion, the sharing of their suffering, coupled with a determination to remove their suffering,” he says. “The other principle that goes along with love is justice….In my understanding, justice arises when we recognize that all people possess intrinsic value, that all are endowed with inherent dignity, and therefore should be helped to realize this dignity.”

How much of this line of thinking is working its way explicitly or implicitly into personal decision making and organizational life that is mission-oriented? Do we have blinders on, permitting us to see only (or primarily) our own objectives and priorities? When we approach donors to invite them to share our concerns and aspirations are we working to connect at the most basic definition of justice? David Cooperrider and Diana Whitney remind us that “human systems grow in the direction of their deepest and most frequent inquiries.”[1] So….what is at the heart of YOUR deepest and most frequent inquiry?

[1] David Cooperrider and Diana Whitney, Appreciative Inquiry: A Positive Revolution in Change, 2005.

A Spectrum of Health System Foundation Postures in a Population Health Context

Posted August 14, 2015 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Planning, Uncategorized

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As we navigate the current environment of Population Health we have to reexamine the posture of philanthropy (and the professionals charged with its effectiveness). Here is a one pager that we’ve developed to frame internal discussions about some available options to consider. We’re working with hospital health systems on reimagining their possibilities. Hope this adds value to your current thinking and planning.

Awake in the World

Posted February 19, 2015 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Uncategorized

I found the following in my morning stream and thought it applicable to how I’m readying my mind for Conversation. I find myself thinking at times that I am fully “awake” in the world. If truth be told, however, I’m more often “focused” rather than truly “awake.” I may salve my conscience by rationalizing that my work and my attitude of engagement is enough to be fully “awake.” Messages like this help me remember that the “awakening” doesn’t end with me. Messages like this make me ask myself whether I’m truly “awake” to what is trying to emerge and unfold in society around me….and if I’m truly “awake” to that realization, how will I be in this world? What will I do? What generosity is required of me?

Hope it resonates with you.

“The path of personal transformation and the path of social transformation are not really separate from each other. We must reclaim the concept of awakening from an exclusively individualistic therapeutic model and focus on how individual liberation also requires social transformation. Engagement in the world is how our personal awakening blossoms.” – David Loy, “Awakening in the Age of Climate Change”

The Leadership Model of Philanthropy

Posted August 22, 2014 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Uncategorized

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Earlier this month the Lumina Foundation’s CEO, Jamie Merisotis, posted an insightful blog entry to the SSIR blog, entitled The Leadership Model of Philanthropy. In it he lifts up the characteristics of focus, flexibility, and fortitude, which, he suggests, must be present for grant-making foundations to truly have systemic impact.

Agreed.

For the moment, let’s not get too lathered up about another “model.” Personally, I’m a bit reticent to toss around the “model” label. Solid contributions along a similar line as Jamie’s have referred to catalytic philanthropy, high impact philanthropy, etc. Despite my caution about falling prey to “model-itis,” his points are right on.

I think there are many parallels in grant-seeking organizations who endeavor to “act bigger and adapt better” (language from the Monitor Institute a few years back). For more organizational CEOs and philanthropy executives to embrace this type of thinking, they’ll need to hone their study of whole systems. I hear a growing desire to “take things to scale” but I don’t always see a corresponding understanding of the systems in which the organization exists. Trying to discern the path to scale without an understanding of systems thinking is hollow and the results will undoubtedly fall short.

A better understanding of whole systems thinking will likely result in a bone deep commitment to true collaboration and it will force one to look at the future with a long lens. Further, I believe it changes the conversation with donors–maybe not all donors but certainly those big thinkers who are not so interested anymore in simply supporting one organization because they’re trying to bring about some type of lasting change in people, in society. They’re looking for something bigger than any single organization. That’s systemic change and THAT’s where the power of philanthropy is at its most robust possibilities. Linked to systems thinking, philanthropy can really be catalytic.

That’s not a conversation every executive or philanthropy executive can have comfortably today–nor is it one every donor will welcome. But if you’re not preparing yourself and your colleagues to think this way, you’ll miss growing opportunities to have a truly big and lasting impact.

GHC Client, Providence Health & Service, Receives $25m Phil Knight Gift

Posted August 13, 2014 by Gary J. Hubbell
Categories: Uncategorized

Congratulations to the medical team leaders, foundation staff, and senior administrators of Providence Health & Services in Portland Oregon. They announced August 12th, the largest living individual gift ever received in the 5 state health system. This gift will support the heart program, primarily at Providence St. Vincent Hospital in Portland. I’m thrilled for the patients and staff of these fine hospitals and super proud of the great relationship work of the docs and foundation team over a span of many years. Kudos all. More details here.